Annette Imhausen

This article is about the historian of mathematics. For the algebraic geometer, see Annette Werner.
Left to right: Annette Imhausen, Jim Ritter, and Paul W. Warner, at the MFO, 2017

Annette Imhausen (also known as Annette Warner, born June 12, 1970) is a German historian of mathematics known for her work on Ancient Egyptian mathematics. She is a professor in the Normative Orders Cluster of Excellence at Goethe University Frankfurt.[1]

Education and career

Imhausen studied mathematics, chemistry, and Egyptology at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, passing the Staatsexamen in 1996. She continued to study Egyptology and Assyriology at the Freie Universität Berlin. She completed her doctorate in the history of mathematics at Mainz in 2002 under the joint supervision of David E. Rowe and James Ritter.[2]

She held a fellowship at the Dibner Institute for the History of Science and Technology (Cambridge, MA) before she was received a Junior Research Fellowship at the University of Cambridge from 2003 to 2006. She returned to Mainz as an assistant professor from 2006 to 2008, and became a professor at Frankfurt in 2009.[1]

Contributions

Imhausen is featured in the BBC TV series The Story of Maths.[3]

Her dissertation, Ägyptische Algorithmen. Eine Untersuchung zu den mittelägyptischen mathematischen Aufgabentexten, was published by Harrassowitz Verlag in 2002 (Ägyptologische Abhandlungen, vol. 65).[1][4] She is also the author of Mathematics in Ancient Egypt: A Contextual History (Princeton University Press, 2016).[5]

References

  1. ^ a b c "Warner (Imhausen), Annette, Prof. Dr.", Normative Orders, Goethe University Frankfurt, retrieved 2018-11-05
  2. ^ Annette Imhausen at the Mathematics Genealogy Project
  3. ^ Annette Imhausen on IMDb
  4. ^ Reviews of Ägyptische Algorithmen. Eine Untersuchung zu den mittelägyptischen mathematischen Aufgabentexten:
  5. ^ Reviews of Mathematics in Ancient Egypt: A Contextual History: